Author: CTV

Alaska salmon deaths blamed on record warm temperatures

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Add salmon to the list of species affected by Alaska's blistering summer temperatures, including the hottest July on record.

Dead salmon have shown up in river systems throughout Alaska, and the mortalities are probably connected to warm water or low river water levels, said Sam Rabung, director of commercial fisheries for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

The department has not quantified past heat-related fish deaths because they tended to be sporadic and inconsistent, Rabung said. But department scientists this year will analyze fish deaths, summarize observation and record effects.

“If we have a few years in a row like this, then I think we have a bigger issue,” he said.

Spent carcasses of salmon that die after females lay eggs and males fertilize them are a common annual sight along Alaska streams and provide nourishment for scavenging birds and bears.

Some carcasses this summer have been a concern because the dead fish were still full of ..

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Russian capsule carrying robot fails space station docking

MOSCOW — A Russian space capsule carrying a humanoid robot has failed to dock as planned with the International Space Station.

A statement from the Russian space agency Roscosmos said the failure to dock on Saturday was because of problems in the docking system. It said the space station itself and the six-person crew are safe.

Vladimir Solovyev, flight director for the Russian segment of the ISS, said a new docking attempt would be made Monday.

The capsule was launched Thursday as part of tests of a new rocket that is expected to replace the Soyuz-FG next year.

It is carrying a robot called Fedor, which will perform two weeks of tests aboard the space station. Solovyev said the robot had not been taught how to manually conduct a docking.

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Researchers probing hidden secrets in waters off northern Labrador coast

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. – A research expedition in northern Labrador is currently assessing vital yet relatively unexplored marine habitats.

The non-profit group Oceana Canada and representatives from the Nunatsiavut Inuit Government are surveying northern fjords, islands around the village of Nain and archeological sites in Hebron and Okak on the 10-day voyage.

Robert Rangeley, Oceana Canada's science director, says the expedition aims to address scientific gaps in key ecosystems, like charting unknown ocean depths and probing what life forms live on the sea floor.

Underwater cameras around fjords have already yielded stunning images of soft corals and “forests” of sea anemones, Rangeley says, both signs of productive, healthy environments.

Locations were chosen based on local interest and existing knowledge, with a view to informing future management decisions.

Rangeley says filling knowledge gaps is essential in these habitats, which are undergoing major changes from cl..

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Extracted eggs may stop extinction of northern white rhino

OL PEJETA, Kenya (AP) — Wildlife experts and veterinarians said Friday there is hope to prevent the extinction of the northern white rhino because they successfully extracted eggs from the last two remaining females of the species. The eggs will be used to reproduce the species through a surrogate.

The groundbreaking procedure was carried out Thursday on the northern white rhinos known as Najin and Fatu who cannot carry a pregnancy. The joint effort by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Avantea, Dvur Kralove Zoo, Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the Kenya Wildlife Service saw a team of vets successfully harvest a total of ten eggs from the rhinos. The eggs are to be artificially inseminated with frozen sperm from a northern white rhino bull and then transferred to a southern white rhino surrogate mother.

“We are very happy that after this first procedure on Najin and Fatu that they have recovered very smoothly and they are doing really well and fine today just 24 hours ..

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Extracted eggs may prevent extinction of northern white rhino

OL PEJETA, Kenya — Wildlife experts and veterinarians say there is hope to prevent the extinction of the northern white rhino because they successfully extracted eggs from the last two remaining females of the species. The eggs will be used to reproduce the species through a surrogate.

The groundbreaking procedure was carried out Thursday on the northern white rhinos known as Najin and Fatu who cannot carry a pregnancy.

The joint effort by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Avantea, Dvur Kralove Zoo, Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the Kenya Wildlife Service saw a team of vets successfully harvest a total of ten eggs from the rhinos. The eggs are to be artificially inseminated with frozen sperm from a northern white rhino bull and then transferred to a southern white rhino surrogate mother.

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