Category: CTV

Tilting your head downward can make you seem more dominant, study suggests

A new study by the University of British Columbia has found that facial expressions aren’t the only source of information for social and public perception – tilting your head down and lowering your chin by just 10 degrees makes you appear more dominant.

“We show that tilting one’s head downward systematically changes the way the face is perceived,” said researchers Zachary Witkower and Jessica Tracy in a press release. “A neutral face – a face with no muscle movement or facial expression – appears to be more dominant when the head is tilted down.”

The effect is achieved by the “artificial appearance of lowered and V-shaped eyebrows” which “elicit perceptions of aggression, intimidation and dominance.”

The study had 101 participants look at three avatars with the same neutral expression, one with head tilted down 10 degrees, one looking straight on, and one with head tilted up 10 degrees.

The participants would ‘judge the dominance’ of each avatar image by rating them using stat..

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At least 279 dolphins dead on Gulf Coast, triple usual number: NOAA

NEW ORLEANS — Authorities say at least 279 dolphins have stranded across the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists say 98% died.

They said during a teleconference Friday that they're investigating whether lingering effects from the 2010 oil spill and low salinity from high rivers and a Louisiana spillway opening contributed.

One said more than one-fifth of the dolphins stranded from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle had sores consistent with freshwater exposure. NOAA's website says such lesions are common in the spring.

A Mississippi scientist says the spillway opening is at least partly to blame for 126 deaths across Mississippi's coastline. Moby Solangi calls it worse than the BP spill. He says 91 dead dolphins were found in Mississippi during all of 2010.

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Thai vets nurture lost dugong calf with milk and sea grass

BANGKOK — A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself.

The estimated 5-month-old female dugong named Marium has become an internet hit in Thailand after images of marine biologists embracing and feeding the aquatic mammal with milk and sea grass spread across social media.

The dugong is a species of marine mammal similar to the American manatee and can grow to about 3.4 metres (11 feet) in length. Its conservation status is listed as vulnerable by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Marium was spotted alone near a beach on Ko Poda island in Krabi province in April. Officials later tried to release it into a dugong habitat off the coast of another island but it swam away.

Veterinarians and volunteers set out each day in canoes to locate Marium near the dugong habitat off Ko Lib..

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Emails show Trump official consulting climate-change rejecters

WASHINGTON — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think-tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails.

The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defence Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to The Associated Press. That request was made this past March to policy advisers with the Heartland Institute, one of the most vocal challengers of mainstream scientific findings that emissions from burning coal, oil and gas are damaging the Earth's atmosphere.

In a March 3 email exchange Happer and Heartland adviser Hal Doiron discuss Happer's scientific arguments in a paper attempting to knock down climate change, as well as ideas to make the work “more useful to a wider readership.” Happer writes he had already discu..

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Emails: Trump official consulted global warming rejecters

WASHINGTON — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think-tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails.

The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defence Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to The Associated Press. That request was made this past March to policy advisers with the Heartland Institute, one of the most vocal challengers of mainstream scientific findings that emissions from burning coal, oil and gas are damaging the Earth's atmosphere.

In a March 3 email exchange Happer and Heartland adviser Hal Doiron discuss Happer's scientific arguments in a paper attempting to knock down climate change as well as ideas to make the work “more useful to a wider readership.” Happer writes he had already discus..

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Vietnam seizes 7.5 tons of elephant ivory, pangolin scales

HANOI, Vietnam — Authorities have seized 7.5 tons of elephant ivory and pangolin scales in one of Vietnam's biggest wildlife trafficking cases.

The 3.5 tons of ivory and 4 tons of pangolin scales were found Wednesday in barrels when customs officers checked a shipping container arriving at northern Hai Phong port, the Vietnam News Agency reported.

The steel barrels containing the ivory and scales were mixed with ones containing tar to conceal the trafficked animal parts from customs authorities.

The freight was addressed to a logistic company in Hai Phong city, but the news website said no one had claimed ownership of the shipment. No details were available on its origin.

Police began a criminal investigation on Friday.

Poaching and trading of ivory tusks and pangolins carry penalties of up to 5 years in jail in Vietnam. However, the Southeast Asian country is also a common destination for trafficked wildlife parts and a transit point for ivory and other trafficked mate..

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Whose land is it anyway? Free app focuses on Canada’s Indigenous history

Instead of telling its users where they are, a new map-based app lets them know what where they are used to be.

Whose Land features interactive maps showing the proliferation of Indigenous communities in North America, past and present.

One map shows Indigenous communities’ traditional territories – the boundaries of their lands before contact with European settlers. Another features the areas covered by treaties with the Canadian and American governments. Another pinpoints locations of current First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities.

“It gives a good representation of how vast Indigenous nations were,” Mitch Holmes, one of the app’s developers, told CTV’s Your Morning on Thursday.

“A lot of people think there [weren’t] that many people here pre-contact, when there were tens of millions of people that were here.”

Teaching history is one of the app’s aims. Another is providing users with the information to properly make land acknowledgements, which have become a regular fea..

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More research labs are retiring monkeys when studies finish

WESTFIELD, Wis. — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health.

But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside, eat lettuce and carrots, dip their fingers in colorful plastic pools, paint, and hang from pipes and tires — in relative quiet.

More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre (7-hectare) rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years, according to the sanctuaries and researchers. For some monkeys, it's their first time hanging out in the fresh air.

“Just to see them look around in amazement. You know it was all very calm and peaceful,” said Amy Kerwin, who worked for 15 years to get the Westfield, Wisconsin, sanctuary off the ground after being employed in a University of Wisconsin research lab.

There were approx..

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Australia approves vast coal mine near Great Barrier Reef

Australia approved Thursday the construction of a controversial coal mine near the Great Barrier Reef, paving the way for a dramatic and unfashionable increase in coal exports.

Queensland's government said it had accepted a groundwater management plan for the Indian-owned Adani Carmichael mine — the last major legal hurdle before construction can begin.

The project, fiercely debated for almost a decade, comes as investors and even energy companies are moving away from fossil fuels amid concern about the climate.

Opponents warn it will create a new generation of coal exports — which will be burned in India and China — contributing to further degrade the planet.

The vast open cut mine is slated to produce up to 60 million tonnes of coal a year, boosting Australia's already vast exports by around 20 per cent.

Coupled with the construction of a railway link, it could open up a swathe of Queensland to further exploitation and new mining projects.

“If all the coal in..

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Spy used AI-generated face to connect with targets, experts say

LONDON — Katie Jones sure seemed plugged into the Washington's political scene. The 30-something redhead boasted a job at a top think-tank and a who's-who network of pundits and experts, from the centrist Brookings Institution to the right-wing Heritage Foundation. She was connected to a deputy assistant secretary of state, a senior aide to a senator and the economist Paul Winfree, who is being considered for a seat on the Federal Reserve.

But Katie Jones doesn't exist, The Associated Press has determined. Instead, the persona was part of a vast army of phantom profiles lurking on the professional networking site LinkedIn.

Experts who reviewed the Jones profile's LinkedIn activity say it's typical of espionage efforts on the professional networking site, whose role as a global Rolodex has made it a powerful magnet for spies.

“It smells a lot like some sort of state-run operation,” said Jonas Parello-Plesner, who serves as program director at the Denmark-..

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German court allows slaughter of male chicks to continue

Germany's top administrative court ruled Thursday that the slaughtering of male chicks may continue in the poultry industry until a method is found to determine the sex of an embryo in the egg.

According to the Federal Ministry of Agriculture around 45 million male chicks are slaughtered in Germany each year.

The killings are highly controversial and opposed by Agriculture Minister Julia Kloeckner in Angela Merkel's government.

“Chick killing is ethically unacceptable and must be stopped as soon as possible,” Kloeckner told daily Rheinische Post, adding that eight million euros ($9 million) had been allocated to help find alternatives.

Several methods for the testing of a chick embryo's sex — which would allow the destruction of eggs before hatching — are being tested, but not yet ready for use on an industrial scale.

On Thursday, Leipzig's Federal Administrative court decided the killing of male chicks is in accordance with the first article of the Anim..

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German court: Breeders can keep killing male chicks for now

BERLIN — A German federal court has ruled that hen breeders can continue to kill male chicks after they hatch, a practice that results in the death of some 45 million birds annually.

The Federal Administrative Court was ruling in a case involving a hatchery specialized in egg-laying hens that killed male chicks because they won't lay eggs and the breed is unsuited to raising for meat. The hatchery was banned from doing so in 2013, but another court then reversed the ban.

The federal court said Thursday a company's economic interests don't constitute a “sensible reason” under animal protection laws for killing the birds. But it said techniques to determine chicks' gender in the egg should soon be available and hatcheries shouldn't be asked to change their practice twice.

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