Category: CTV

Apple to reportedly launch two new AirPods in 2019

On Wednesday, Digitimes and reliable Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo reported that new AirPods are set to launch this year. The questions that now remains is whether we'll be seeing one or two new models.

Apple launched the second generation of its iconic AirPods just one month ago, but another set — maybe even two more pairs — of the wireless earbuds will reportedly launch before the end of 2019. The information comes from Digitimes and the notable and highly reliable Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo (via 9to5Mac).

According to Digitimes' industry sources, Apple will launch the third-generation model, which will feature active noise-cancelling technology, sometime this year.

Just a little later in the day on Wednesday, 9to5Mac noted Kuo reporting that Apple will launch two new AirPods models that could arrive as early as the fourth quarter of 2019. While one will likely be a third-generation iteration of the current model and will be available at the same price point, the secon..

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Walmart experiments with AI to monitor stores in real time

LEVITTOWN, N.Y. — Who's minding the store? In the not-too-distant future it could be cameras and sensors that can tell almost instantly when bruised bananas need to be swapped for fresh ones and more cash registers need to open before lines get too long.

Walmart, which faces fierce competition from Amazon and other online retailers, is experimenting with digitizing its physical stores to manage them more efficiently, keep costs under control and make the shopping experience more pleasant. On Thursday, the retail giant will open its Intelligent Retail Lab inside a 50,000-square-foot Neighborhood Market grocery store on Long Island.

Thousands of cameras suspended from the ceiling, combined with other technology like sensors on shelves, will monitor the store in real time so its workers can quickly replenish products or fix other problems.

The technology, shown first to The Associated Press, will also be able to spot spills, track when shelves need to be restocked and known wh..

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Climate activists glue themselves to London Stock Exchange

LONDON — Environmental activists are blocking the main entrance to the London Stock Exchange after gluing themselves to the doorway while wearing LED displays reading “climate emergency.”

The Extinction Rebellion demonstrators also climbed on top of a Docklands Light Railway train at Canary Wharf station in east London as they focus on the city's financial centres during the final day of protests in the capital. The group says the financial services industry is being targeted for “funding climate and ecological destruction.”

Activists held signs saying “business as usual

death” and “don't jail the canaries.”

Some 1,000 people have been arrested during the protests, which started April 15. More than 10,000 police officers have been deployed in response to demonstrations that disrupted transportation by targeting bridges, intersections and commuter trains.

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”Complete breeding failure’ at Antarctic emperor penguin haven

WASHINGTON — For the past three years, virtually nothing has hatched at Antarctica's second biggest breeding grounds for emperor penguins and the start of this year is looking just as bleak, a new study found.

Usually 15,000 to 24,000 breeding pairs of emperor penguins flock yearly to a breeding site at Halley Bay , considered a safe place that should stay cold this century despite global warming. But almost none have been there since 2016, according to a study in Wednesday's Antarctic Science.

The breeding pair population has increased significantly at a nearby breeding ground, but the study's author said it is nowhere near the amount missing at Halley Bay.

“We've never seen a breeding failure on a scale like this in 60 years,” said study author Phil TrMajor emperor athan, head of conservation biology at the British Antarctic Survey. “It's unusual to have a complete breeding failure in such a big colony.”

Normally about 8% of the world's emperor ..

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20,000 kilometres over the ocean: Tracking a songbird’s remarkable journey

Ontario researchers have led an international team that tracked an “incredible” 20,000-kilometre voyage by a tiny songbird in an effort to understand why its population has collapsed and how it can be saved.

Ryan Norris, an ecology professor at the University of Guelph, and his team discovered that the blackpoll warbler, which weighs the same as two loonies, migrates from its breeding grounds in northwest North America to the eastern seaboard where it refuels.

Then it takes a straight, non-stop shot south over the Atlantic Ocean to its winter grounds in the Amazon basin. Then they go back again. The blackpolls repeat that journey every year.

“That whole round trip is incredible for a bird that size,” Norris said, “just incredible.”

Incredible is a word Norris uses often about the bird. In 2015, using “incredible little backpacks” strapped to the birds for tracking, Norris and his team showed for the first time that blackpolls fly from the Maritimes and Vermont south over the At..

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Twitter adds way to report voter-tricking tweets

Twitter on Wednesday began making it easier to report tweets aimed at interfering with people voting, starting first in Europe and India.

An option to report Twitter messages as being misleading about voting was being added to the one-to-many messaging service's app in India and Europe, with a promise it would be expanded globally through the year.

“Any attempts to undermine the process of registering to vote or engaging in the electoral process is contrary to our company's core values,” the Twitter safety team said in an online post.

“We are further expanding our enforcement capabilities in this area by creating a dedicated reporting feature within the product to allow users to more easily report this content to us.”

Twitter teams entrusted to review reported content have been trained as part of an enhanced appeals process in the event tweet removal decisions are challenged, according to the San Francisco-based company.

“You may not use Twitter's services for ..

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Robotic device winds its own way through beating pig heart

WASHINGTON — Scientists have created a small robotic device that guides itself safely through a beating pig's heart, demonstrating what such tools might one day do in surgery.

And they borrowed some tricks from animals to do the job. To find its way to a specific point in the heart, the thin tube called a catheter gently tapped its path along heart walls and to a valve, much like how cockroaches skitter along walls and rats reach out with their whiskers

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital tested their robot in pigs. Experienced doctors were a little faster threading catheters into place. But researchers say robotic devices might one day do routine steps in operations so doctors could focus on more complicated tasks.

The research was published Wednesday in Science Robotics.

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Columbus sailing ship replica La Nina sinks again in Texas

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — A docked replica of a Christopher Columbus ship that sank in 2017 days after Hurricane Harvey struck Texas has swamped again.

Officials say divers will examine La Nina at the Corpus Christi Marina before efforts begin to refloat the ship that sank Tuesday.

La Nina, although in disrepair, has been a tourist attraction. The 22.86-metre ship sank in August 2017 after Harvey, but was repaired and refloated.

The volunteer Columbus Sailing Association said it could no longer maintain the ship after Harvey. Corpus Christi leaders are also trying to find someone to restore the replica built by Spain in the 1980s to mark the 500th anniversary of the Columbus voyage to the New World.

Association president Kim Mrazek said Tuesday that donations have funded prior La Nina repairs.

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Students pitch next wave of science research for national ‘Biogenius’ competition

High school students are competing for a spot in a national science completion in May, where the winner for Canada will go head to head against students from across the world.

In the past several weeks, teenagers in different parts of Canada have been pitching graduate-level projects competing in the Sanofi Biogenius Competition.

“It’s really inspiring to see all these kids really putting a lot of effort into this,” lead organizer Andrew Ross told CTV Kitchener.

Students punched well above their weight on Wednesday at the University of Waterloo, with health science research including antibiotic resistance, cancer therapy and Alzheimer’s.

In May, the regional winners, including the upcoming winner of southwestern Ontario, will go on to compete nationally in Toronto. The national winner will then compete internationally.

Ross explained that Waterloo is actually the eighth stop of the competition for 2019.

The University of British Columbia will be the last regional stop in Ca..

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Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

NEW YORK — Eyeing that can of soda in the supermarket cooler? Or maybe you're craving a pint of ice cream? A camera could be watching you.

But it's not there to see if you're stealing. These cameras want to get to know you and what you're buying.

It's a new technology being trotted out to retailers, where cameras try to guess your age, gender or mood as you walk by. The intent is to use the information to show you targeted real-time ads on in-store video screens.

Companies are pitching retailers to bring the technology into their physical stores as a way to better compete with online rivals like Amazon that are already armed with troves of information on their customers and their buying habits.

With store cameras, you may not even realize you are being watched unless you happen to notice the penny-sized lenses. And that has raised concerns over privacy.

“The creepy factor here is definitely a 10 out of 10,” said Pam Dixon, the executive director of t..

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Egypt: Archaeologists uncover ancient tomb with mummies

CAIRO — Egypt says archaeologists have uncovered an ancient tomb with mummies believed to date back about 2,000 years in the southern city of Aswan.

The Antiquities Ministry said in a statement on Tuesday that the tomb is from the Greco-Roman period, which began with Alexander the Great in 332 B.C.

It is located near one of Aswan's landmarks, the Mausoleum of Aga Khan, who lobbied for Muslim rights in India and who was buried there after his death in 1957.

The statement said archaeologists found artifacts, including decorated masks, statuettes, vases, coffin fragments and cartonnages — chunks of linen or papyrus glued together.

Egypt often announces new discoveries, hoping to spur the country's tourism sector, which has suffered major setbacks during the turmoil following the 2011 uprising against autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

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Egypt: Archeologists uncover ancient tomb containing mummies

CAIRO — Egypt says archeologists have uncovered an ancient tomb with mummies believed to date back about 2,000 years in the southern city of Aswan.

The Antiquities Ministry said in a statement on Tuesday that the tomb is from the Greco-Roman period, which began with Alexander the Great in 332 B.C.

It is located near one of Aswan's landmarks, the Mausoleum of Aga Khan, who lobbied for Muslim rights in India and who was buried there after his death in 1957.

The statement said archeologists found artifacts, including decorated masks, statuettes, vases, coffin fragments and cartonnages — chunks of linen or papyrus glued together.

Egypt often announces new discoveries, hoping to spur the country's tourism sector, which has suffered major setbacks during the turmoil following the 2011 uprising against autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

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